The Story of Saint Patrick

     The following article was first published in The New Mountain Statesman in the March 2001 edition and is copyrighted material. This cannot be re-published or copied without the author’s permission.-Evelyn Wallace, The Castle Lady 

 
          March 17th is a day associated with all things Irish. There are many legends surrounding St. Patrick, many of which are not true. The fact is however, his real life was more adventurous than most of the folklore surrounding him.
          Called the "Apostle of Ireland" he was born in southwestern Britain circa 389 A.D. by the name Succat. He was kidnapped at age sixteen by Irish marauders and became a herdsman at Mt. Slemish in County Antrim in Ulster. After six years in slavery he escaped to Gaul and fourteen years later he was ordained deacon at Auxerre.
          After he was consecrated bishop he returned to Ireland after he had a series of dreams in which the Irish were calling him back. Among his many conversions in Ulster, King Laoghaire (pron. Leery by Americans but Law-ree by the Irish!) was his most famous and included his entire court at Tara. He established churches throughout the country, more than sixty, and placed native Irish Bishops in most of them.
          St. Patrick’s benediction for Ireland at Mt. Aigli was that the Irish would obtain God’s clemency, that barbarian invaders would not prevail on Irish soil and that on Judgement Day no living person would be in Ireland.
          St.Patrick is most famous for using the shamrock as an illustration of the Trinity, which has come to be regarded as the national Irish symbol. He died March 17, 461 and is buried with two other saints in County Down just outside Belfast.
                       By Evelyn M. Wallace
              All rights reserved 2006 
Tomorrow we’ll be back to Northumberland in England! The Castle Lady      
Advertisements

About Evelyn

The Castle Lady Official web site: www.ilovecastles.com other blogs: ilovecastles.blogspot.com evelynsrockpages.blogspot.com evelyns-nailsforlife.blogspot.com
This entry was posted in History. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Story of Saint Patrick

  1. Pingback: Drunky McDrunkerson ? | Evelyn Wallace -The Castle Lady

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s